economy

Free-range vs. institutionally-schooled kids with unschooling advocate Dayna Martin

Free-range vs. institutionally-schooled kids with unschooling advocate Dayna Martin

Dayna Martin has four children ranging in age from 9yrs -18yrs old and all of them have been unschooled. They’ve never attended ANY school or institutionalized education program. Dayna has become an activist for the unschooling movement, in fact her book, “Radical Unschooling: A Revolution Has Begun,” was a launching pad that landed her on Dr. Phil, CNN, Nightline, 60 Minutes, The Jeff Probst Show, Wife Swap and yes, even Oprah.   

It’s hard to imagine the bravery of deciding not to do what everybody else is doing. Can you imagine not sending your kids to school? The commitment? Having people at the grocery store ask you what grade they’re in? You’d have to constantly have to explain to everyone while they all talked behind your back. Those are the topics perfect for this show. 

The Inevitable Future of Jobs with Wired Founder Kevin Kelly

The Inevitable Future of Jobs with Wired Founder Kevin Kelly

Everyday in the media is an article about jobs— how they’re disappearing for the middle class, how robots and artificial intelligence are stealing them, how the Gig-Economy is forcing people to do mundane tasks for less money. How true is it that our jobs are disappearing and how much is technology to blame?

What is the inevitability of the future of jobs and why can’t we imagine what that looks like? It’s hard to imagine talking to anyone better about this, than Kevin Kelly. He’s the co-founder of Wired Magazine (as he calls it the “Senior Maverick”) and he has a recent book called, “The Inevitable” (which has recently been released in paperback). It’s a New York Times and Wall Street Journal Best Seller. What Kevin has done is mapped the 12 major trends that have already made themselves apparent and will definitely shape our future. Kevin is amazing at packaging all those ideas that live within those trends and making those things digestible. As you’ll hear, us humans are pretty horrible at figuring out what’s coming next. 

How poor cultures capitalize on historic sites with Archeologist Larry Coben

How poor cultures capitalize on historic sites with Archeologist Larry Coben

If you’re a regular listener to this podcast you’ve probably heard me bash capitalism a lot. The reality is there’s no escaping it, it’s taken over nearly every corner of the world. That certainly hasn’t stopped me from wincing whenever I travel to a far-away lands and am met with local trinket shops and people peddling their wares. But who am I to judge whether this is good or bad for a society. Oftentimes these are poor, macho communities with substantial pressures on them. They see the money come in and out of their world without them able to touch it. Often these countries also have remote destinations that house incredible archeological sites, but have a community that remains poor and helpless to take advantage of its history. And then there’s the question: should they? And if they do, what would that do to their culture? Would it be a positive or negative thing to suddenly take capitalism and mix it with something like archeology? 

How culture controls our decisions with behaviorial economist Dan Ariely

How culture controls our decisions with behaviorial economist Dan Ariely

We’re born into a culture where trillions of decisions have already been made by the people who have lived before us. The entire human world is constructed of these expectations, so by the time we join that world as an adult, it’s pretty easy to feel like most of our decisions are limited and oftentimes made for us. When that operating system is screaming to go to school, get a job, buy all stuff that makes your life better, have some kids and borrow enough money to make it all happen, it can feel like your margin for independent ideas and motivation just got squashed.  It’s no wonder the decisions we think we’re making don’t feel very rational. No wonder how we can completely lose the motivation to keep slaving away. If you were an alien watching our evolution, you’d see a few big decisions but on a day-to-day basis we’re blind to how the decisions we’re making affect not only our own life but the future of our culture. 

Why everything feels so fake with author Chris Ryan

Why everything feels so fake with author Chris Ryan

There are two kinds of people: those of us that are domesticated and those that feel strangely out of place. The ones that feel out of place, might not be able to communicate why, but know in their gut not only that our world is toxic but that the systems and traditions we’ve created don’t feel even close to natural. No matter which camp you fall in, both feel depressed, frustrated, anxious and flat-out unsatisfied as they get dragged through our culture’s unfriendly demands just to stay afloat. Have you ever asked yourself how and why we’ve sabotaged ourselves like this? Author and Psychologist Chris Ryan, has tackled big parts of the Matrix through his and his wife’s book, Sex at Dawn, his podcast Tangentially Speaking and his forthcoming book Civilized to Death.

How race has deeply divided the parties with Stanford Sociologist Doug McAdam

How race has deeply divided the parties with Stanford Sociologist Doug McAdam

It’s actually a fact that our political parties have never-- in the history of the United States-- been so deeply divided. Have you ever wondered how we got this way? Well I was shocked to find out that it was actually race, starting with the Civil Rights Movement, that created this incredible separation between parties. This year’s election marks potentially the most dramatic division that we’ve ever had and it could be the beginning of a schism that completely shakes up our two-party system. While a lot of us have opinions about politics, Stanford Professor Doug Mcadam is a Political Sociologist that researches the facts around the subject. He’s the former Director of Center of Advance Study in Behavioral Sciences, he’s authored 18 books and 85 other publications all focused on Political Sociology with emphasis on race and social movements. So if there’s anyone who understands how the color of our skin has created two parties that pretty much don’t talk to each other anymore, it’s Doug.

How tech is ctrl+alt deleting the middle class with MIT's Andrew McAfee

How tech is ctrl+alt deleting the middle class with MIT's Andrew McAfee

Even without hard numbers you most likely feel the economic polarization that’s been happening over the last few decades. And who needs numbers to know just how much technology has changed our lives. It’s the connection between tech and the economy that I personally find super fascinating and it’s an area of expertise for this week’s guest, MIT’s Andrew McAfee. Andrew is a principle research scientist at MIT. He’s focused on how tech is changing business, the economy and society overall. He’s written a number of books on this, the most recent one is The Second Machine Age, which was a New York Times bestseller and won a book of the year award. He has been a referenced source by Harvard Business Review, The Economist, The Wall St. Journal, and The New York Times. He’s talked about his work on The Charlie Rose Show and 60 Minutes, at TED, Davos, the Aspen Ideas Festival, and in front of many other audiences.

Dismantling suburbia with author James Howard Kunstler

Dismantling suburbia with author James Howard Kunstler

As day-by-day goes by do you even have a sinking feeling that none of life-as-we-know it, is sustainable? There’s a fragility to the things that we’ve built in our post-WW2 civilization that seems like it could topple over at any minute. It just doesn’t make sense. Surely we know there’s not really an endless stream of resources and a well-oiled machine that backs up the world that we’ve come to expect and rely on. If you want a completely different point of view on what that means long-term, then this podcast with James Howard Kunstler is a must-listen.  Jim is an author and a critic with many non-fiction, novels and plays behind him. He’s also done a fantastic TED talk on “The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs,” a lecturer at universities not to mention a frequent contributor to The Atlantic Monthly, Slate.com, RollingStone, The New York Times Sunday Magazine.